How to Improve as an Athlete by Coach Nick Scott

“The Mash Blueprint for Strength Programming” and “Squat Every Day II: Variations in Intensity and Volume” have both launched at the lowest price that they will ever be. Prices will go up on Monday. Check them out below:

==> “Squat Every Day II and The Mash Blueprint”

Today I want to introduce someone to all of you. Coach Nick Scott has already been assisting Mash Elite Performance with some new programs that we are working on for all the CrossFitters and functional fitness enthusiasts around the world. Today we will start out with his background, and then he will answer the question “How do I improve?” Enjoy!

Let’s start with his background-

Nicholas Scott

I have been a CrossFit affiliate owner for 5 years. I started my gym in my back yard on a 14’x15’ slab of concrete with some pull up bars stuck into the ground and a squat rack. I have been a personal trainer since 2005, and a CrossFit coach and athlete since 2009. Every year since 2011 I have qualified athletes to Regionals, and have even competed at Regionals twice myself. Over the years I have had the incredible privilege of learning from some of the world’s greatest coaches. I started my coaching education by learning from Rick Hussey and Becca Sawnson at Omaha’s Big Iron gym. They introduced me to powerlifting training and the sport of powerlifting.

After receiving my CrossFit Level 1 in 2010 I was lucky enough to be coached and trained in Olympic weightlifting by coaches Mike Burgener, Ursula Garza, Jodi Vaughn, Chad Vaughn, and Cody Burgener. After that I received my CrossFit Endurance certification and worked with several triathletes and marathon runners.

In 2011 I was able to learn movement and mobility from Dr. Kelly Starrett during my certification, also was able to receive coaching from Carl Paoli in gymnastics during that same time. In 2011 and 2012 I competed on my affiliate team at Regionals, also having qualified as a individual in 2012 as well. In 2013 I received my certification in Westside Barbell methods from Shane Sweatt and Laura Phelps. I have received personal coaching from both of these phenomenal coaches, and we remain good friends to this day.
To date I have coached and programmed for 19 CrossFit Regional athletes, 1 Kona Ironman top 10 finisher, and 1 World Masters gold medalist (Olympic weightlifting). I program for several CrossFit affiliates as well.

Over this journey I have been able to leave my ego (mostly) at the door, and continue my pursuit of knowledge among these multiple disciplines with a open mind. I am fond of saying “always a white belt”, meaning that one is always a student. With this mentality I have been able to stay ahead of the curve, and always able to help my athletes stay competitive. In this time I have tried many approaches, many successful, some average, and even some that didn’t work at all. Over these experiences I have developed my own system/method of programming. It’s fairly unique from what is generally available at this time, and draws from all of the amazing individuals I’ve had the immense honor of learning from (many of them listed above).

Now he will answer the questions, “How do I improve?”-

I want to address something I get thrown at me all the time: when someone walks up to me and says “I really am not where I want to be right now, and I don’t feel like I’m getting any better.” or “I want to be really good, and at such and such level.”

Ok, I’m going to start this off with a quote “You are what you repeatedly do.” So with that in mind here is my take on this standard line I keep receiving.

Ask yourself these 5 questions.

#1. Take a look at the people in your gym, are there a lot of really great athletes, a small group, a few, a couple, or none at all?

#2. Does your coach or coaching staff get hired by athletes outside of your gym to train them? Do they get asked by other gyms to hold training camps or seminars? Do your coaches host training camps, or seminars from other high level coaches/gyms in order to advance their own knowledge?

#3. How good of athletes are your coaches, can they do all of the movements you are being asked to do so that they can demonstrate?

#4. If there are good athletes in your gym, did they come into the gym at a high level from previous training, or have they been developed at your gym for a decent measure of time?

#5. How long has your gym been open and how long have you been going?

Now, after collecting this data, you can come up with some pretty accurate conclusions as to the quality of training you are receiving and the level you can expect to attain while at that gym. If the answers paint a picture that doesn’t thrill you….well then, you have three choices. One, go to a different gym with the things you are looking for. Two, seek outside help. Try hiring a local coach or even a remote coach who meets your criteria. Three, try to get more knowledge to your coaches. Ask them to host a seminar, training camp, or what have you from elite level coaches.

So as I opened this with the quote “You are what you repeatedly do,” then if your coach/coaches or gym are consistently producing high level athletes then they are maintaining a standard of excellence that is applicable to all levels of athletes. The proof is in the pudding as they say, all you need to do is look around objectively and you’ll find the answers you’re looking for.

HUGE ANNOUNCEMENT:

We have been waiting so long, and the day is finally here. Today we launch two new resources that we have been working on for months.

First, there’s the Mash Blueprint for Strength Programming. It’s a simple but effective system for building your own program. There are guidelines for how to add assistance and cardio – as well as how to change the program so you can keep progressing for a lifetime of gains.

We’re also launching #SquatEveryDay II: Variations in Intensity and Volume. The original #SquatEveryDay from last year works perfectly for some athletes. However, I’ve realized that some of my lifters have different volume needs. So in this second #SquatEveryDay book, I’ve outlined two levels of higher volume programs. Lifters tend to fall into one of three categories as far as volume requirements – and with both #SquatEveryDay books, you will now have programs for all three levels.

And while we’re launching these products, you can grab The Blueprint and grab #SquatEveryDay II right now for the lowest price they will ever be.

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