Coaching Athletes: Transferable Movements

Guys and Gals if you want to learn all that it takes to build champion athletes, Zach Even-Esh and I are getting together for two dual certifications this year. Check them out at ⇒ Mash and Even-Esh Unite

March 17th and 18th at the Mash Compound in Clemmons, NC

June 10th and 11th at Underground Strength and Conditioning in Manasquan, NJ

Coaching Athletes: Transferable Movements

I have coached athletes since 1997. By athletes I am referring to football, basketball, soccer, and all the rest. Basically, I am talking about all the athletes outside of strength sports. It’s my way of differentiating for all of you. Over the years, I have tried several methods. All of those years of trial and error have led me to my current way of programming for athletes.

Here’s what I have found. A simple approach will yield the most results. Today we are going to talk about the weight room specifically, but a lot of these same ideas will transfer to speed, agility, and jump training as well.

Here are the movements that I have found are the most important:

1. The Clean- I use this movement for maximal power production, kinesthetic awareness, mobility, and overall athleticism. Studies have shown that the most power is utilized when performing the clean. This power transfers to vertical leap and acceleration.

If you are good at teaching the clean, you will teach your athletes to be aware of the bar in relation to the body. Basically it’s a great way to teach your athletes awareness of their bodies in space. This is an athletic trait that is otherwise very hard to develop, but so very important.

The catch of the clean requires optimal mobility in the hips, ankles, and thoracic spine. Specific mobility work is definitely a good thing. However, the body responds better when practicing specific movements. The body adapts over time to meet the requirements of movements that athletes practice.

Strength coaches often overlook perfect movement. They focus too much on numbers like maximums in bench press or squat. Here’s the thing that all of you need to know. If an athlete can move well, they will be ahead of 75% of their opponents. Unhindered movement allows athletes to be faster and more agile. They are able to get into position uncompromised.

I have an athlete, Trip McNeill that plays offensive line at Duke University. He is 6’5” and over 300lb. His size is impressive, but it is his movement that makes him deadly. He could clean and squat with perfect movement patterns. A big guy that can move as well is a deadly force on the football field.

2. The Squat- Absolute strength is important because it pretty much makes everything better. If someone’s squat goes up, normally so does their speed, vertical leap, ability to change direction, and their clean as long as movement and relative strength remain the same or get better.

There are plenty of studies that show a direct correlation between squats and vertical leap and squats and 40-yard dash times. You can’t ignore that as a strength coach. When I was visiting Florida State University a year ago, I found it super interesting that the strength coach was using data from tendo units in the squat to predict PRs on the track. He was predicting PRs on the track by the bar speed with 85+% Back Squats. They were using those numbers in the weight room to dial in track practice volumes and intensities. So cool!

3. A Press- I use the bench press, strict press, and push presses for my athletes. I like the bench press for overall fiber recruitment. This one is especially important for football players. They have to maintain strong upper bodies to stabilize their torsos for those collisions and fights in the trenches.

I really like using push presses at least once per week because it teaches athletes the connection between the hips and the arms. Nothing powerful in the upper body happens without amazing strength in the hips. Think about it for a moment. A punch comes from the hips delivered out through the fist. A baseball pitch originates from the hips. The push press requires some strong shoulders and triceps, but the movement originates from the hips.

4. A pull- In this category, I like using the deadlift, clean pull, and Romanian Deadlift. The goal is to develop the posterior chain. The posterior chain is directly related to speed and vertical leap. You will never find a great sprinter with small hamstrings and glutes.

A strong posterior chain will also help bulletproof your athletes on the field. A strong posterior chain has been shown to prevent injuries. Pulling will also give field athletes more muscle mass in the neck, traps, and upper back, which will help absorb energy during collisions protecting the brain and spinal cord a bit more.

5. Important accessory work- I don’t get fancy in this category. I use carries, pull-ups, pushups, and dips for the most part. Relative strength is important because on the field the athlete simply has to move their own body weight around. That ability is often overlooked. Carries are great for stabilization in the torso, hips, legs, and feet. Basically carries are the ultimate core and stabilization movements.

Guys that’s it. I keep it simple. You can get as complicated as you want, but these are the movements that I have found to work. These movements helped my man Cade Carney get the third best Nike Football Combine score in the entire country. These movements helped him earn the starting running back position as a true freshman at Wake Forest University.

Here’s an example of a typical week for a 3-Day Per Week Football Workout:

Day 1 Week 1
Back Squat 5RM (1st rep paused 5 sec), then -10% for 2×5 not paused
Clean Paused 2 inches off Ground EMOMs Start at 70% 8 sets x 1 rep working up heavy but no misses
Bench Press 5RM (1st rep paused 5 sec), then -10% for 2×5 not paused
Push Presses 5RM, then -10% for 2×5
Upper Muscular Imbalance Work 1 1a. Weighted Push-Ups
1b. Bentover Rows
1c. KB Swings

Day 2
Front Squat 3RM(1st rep paused 3 sec), then -10% for 2×3 not paused
Hang Clean 3RM, then -10% for 3
Bench Press Pause all Reps Speed day Start at 60% 8 sets x 3 rep working up heavy but no misses 60 sec/set
Deadlift EMOMs Paused 2 sec 2 inches off Floor 70% 6×1 work up but not past 90%
Upper Muscular Imbalance 2 1a. Pullups
1b. Dips
1c. KB High Pulls

Day 3
Back Squat 3RM(1st rep paused 3 sec), then -10% for 2×3 not paused
Clean Complex Max 2 Clean Pulls to 2 Cleans & 2 Front Squats Max
Closegrip Bench 10RM, then -10% for 2×10
RDLs 3×8
Core Muscular Imbalance 2 1b. Unilateral Farmer’s Carry

If you are a strength coach out there, I hope that this helps you simplify your programming efforts. Dan John has taught a simple approach for years. I promise that a simple approach will always yield the best results. Now go out there and get your athletes ready to kill it.

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Guys and Gals if you want to learn all that it takes to build champion athletes, Zach Even-Esh and I are getting together for two dual certifications this year. Check them out at ⇒ Mash and Even-Esh Unite

March 17th and 18th at the Mash Compound in Clemmons, NC

June 10th and 11th at Underground Strength and Conditioning in Manasquan, NJ

Here’s what to expect:

• 1) Athlete Warm Ups & Assessments / Large Group Training
• 2) Bodyweight & Jump Training for Athletes (Sport + Strength Athletes)
• 3) Quick Lifts & Assistance Work for Sport & Strength Athletes (Barbell / Dumbbells)
• 4) Program Design for Athletes from Youth to D1 to Olympic Hopefuls
• 5. Snatch basics and teaching progressions
• 6. Clean basics and teaching progressions
• 7. Squat Programming and Tricks
• 8. Deadlift Programming and Tricks
• 9. Controlling and demanding the respect of groups
• 10. The business of Private Coaching

Extras-

• This will certify you as an official Underground Strength Coach
• This will certify you for the Mash Mafia Learn 2 Lift Cert

Find out more at:

www.MashElite.com/seminars/

No Weaknesses Paying Off

Check out one of our six E-Books:

• “Squat Every Day”
• “Eat What You Want”
• “Squat Every Day 2”
• “No Weaknesses”
• “Mash Program Sampler”
• “The Mash Blueprint for Program Design”

Check them out here: ⇒ Mash Elite E-Books

No Weaknesses Paying Off

Yesterday I started my training off at TFW Winston-Salem with my training partner Chris Ox Mason. This is the day that we perform our “no weaknesses” training combined with conditioning and mobility. I think that Ox is on to something with these workouts. They have improved my conditioning by 100%, but they do way more than that.

Once my heart rate returns to normal, they leave me feeling better. I have PRed my Front Squat two-weeks in a row during the evening session after these workouts. This week I hit a massive marker of 227k/500lb in the Front Squat, and I believe that I owe a big percentage of these improvements to these workouts. Our mobility is focused on the following:

• Overall hip movement
• Squat Quality
• Thoracic Spine Movement

The “No Weaknesses” or muscular imbalance and stability work is focused on:

• Scapula Stabilization
• Overhead stability
• Core Stabilization with different versions of carries

Here’s what the workouts looked like:

-Round 1 (3 Rounds of the following)

• 20 second sprint on Aerodyne Bike
• Trap Bar Carry 40 yd
• Leap Frogs x 10

-Round 2 (3 Rounds of the following)
• 20 seconds sprint on Aerodyne Bike
• One Arm Kettlebell Overhead Carry 20yd ea arm
• Med Ball Rotations into wall 5 per side

-Round 3 (3 Rounds of the following)
• 20 seconds sprint on Aerodyne Bike
• Bear Hug Carry 100+lb Heavy Bar 40yd
• Grasshoppers 5 per leg

This workout was tough. We took two minutes between rounds. Within 30-minutes afterwards, I felt better than when I walked in. I believe that this is the key to a great workout. You don’t need to be crushed for two-days to consider something a good workout.

A couple of good things that happened during the workout:

1. I was able to use the most weight yet in the kettlebell bottom up carries. This is a huge advantage for me. I fractured a cervical vertebra in 2007, which dramatically affected the strength in my left arm. Ever since that accident, I normally spin towards the right, which is my dominant arm. For the last three weeks, I have caught all of my snatches without turning or stepping. This is a huge objective marker that confirms the effectiveness of these workouts.

2. I was able to complete the workout without quitting or redlining. I have asthma. Asthma can really send me into a panic when I lose my breath. The only hard part was bear hugging the heavy bag. Two weeks ago, I had to quit because this movement sent me into a panic. I was able to cruise through the movement this week.

3. My Hip Mobility has improved a great deal. You can look at my Instagram @coachtravismash and you will see my squats improving week to week both in depth and position. Yesterday’s 227k/500lb was the deepest and best position of all my recent squats.

Since the workouts have very little eccentric contractions or joint loading, they are easily recovered from. Actually the carries and movement work get my muscles activated and moving better than ever for my evening workouts. I am able to warm-up quicker and move better than ever for the second workout each day.

I give Ox Mason full credit for developing these great workouts. Our workouts are finished on less than an hour including our warm-up. We end the workout rolling each other out with Donnie Thompson’s awesome mobility tools like the “ex-wife”. They really help to break up scar tissue and improve muscle tissue. I have never experience workouts that kicked my butt like these that also left me feeling better for the rest of the day. Coach Mason’s unique combinations are perfect. Maybe you guys can get some cool ideas.

You can see some video clips on my Instagram: @coachtravismash

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Check out one of the Online Teams:

• Mash Mafia Bronze
• Mash Mafia Silver
• Mash Mafia Gold
• Eat What You Want
• Eat and Lift What You Want

Check them out here: ⇒ Mash Mafia Online Teams

Go Out and Fall by Joel Slate

Joel is a Team Mash Mafia Online Team Member and a Brother in Christ. A lot of people submit pieces to me, but this one was both well written and presented a powerful message. I hope that all of you enjoy this piece. You can follow Joel on Instagram at: @joelslate

Go Out and Fail

The Oxford English Dictionary defines failure several ways, including a “lack of success”, “an unsuccessful person or thing”, “a lack or deficiency of a desired quality”, and “the action or state of not functioning”. Some examples of the word in use might be “he was a failure in business”, “the plane crashed after engine failure”, or “my father was diagnosed with heart failure”. Not one of those examples gives you a warm and fuzzy feeling about how failure can be a good thing. I’m going to show you how to leverage failure for increased success, on the platform, and in life.

Where am I coming from? I’ll tell you. I’m a 42 year old mid-level manager at the paper mill. I’ve got an engineering degree and an MBA, and a wife and four kids age 8 and under at home. I grew up in a middle-class family, was pretty good at football and track, and I like to barbecue and maybe drink a couple of beers from time to time. In other words, I’m probably a lot like you, or who you will be a few years from now.

I’m probably like you in a few other ways too…my job can be stressful at times, there’s never quite enough money in the bank, I too have some skeletons in my closet, and most of all, I’ve failed at a few things that I really wanted to succeed in. Maybe a business went under or a relationship didn’t last. Maybe you didn’t get that promotion when the guy who did had no business getting it. All those things have happened to me too. Maybe, like me, you didn’t hit that PR weight on the platform that you really wanted to hit. It was almost there, you gave it everything, and just couldn’t stand it up. Good…now where do we go from here?

If you failed at a lift, failed at a business, in your job, or in a relationship because of a lack of preparation, or worse yet, a lack of effort, you’ve got a serious decision to make, right now. You’re at a fork in the road and the long term consequences of which way you decide to turn are serious. If you can admit that your failure was due to your poor decisions about training, effort, or preparation, and you reflect on those factors to enact genuine change in your life, you can move on. If you want to blame others and not make the requisite changes, prepare for a long miserable life full of excuses and disappointments.

The other side of failure is positive. Maybe you missed a PR attempt, but it was close. You gave it everything you had and kept fighting but just couldn’t get it up. Maybe you did your very best at work, but there was someone just a bit better. Maybe your business idea was really good and you tried your best, but someone else was better capitalized than you. These are failures we can learn from and we WILL use for inspiration and motivation to get better next time.

Let me tell you about two great failures that I had last weekend. I entered a powerlifting meet, the USAPL Louisiana State Championships. I haven’t powerlifted competitively in nearly 20 years. I’m a weightlifter and a hammer thrower, not a powerlifter. However, I’ve been training hard at my squats and deadlifts as part of my weightlifting programming, so I figured “what the hell, why not?” I’d hit some good numbers in training, including a 470 lb. squat and a 550 lb. deadlift (from 4” blocks), so I knew I’d be able to be reasonably competitive once I got on the platform.

I opened with a 452 lb. squat that came up really easy. I went to 474 lb. on my second attempt, and got it. Since there is no better place to go big than the meet platform, I went for 502 lbs. on my last attempt. I haven’t squatted over 500 since 2003 or 2004. My name was called, so I came out, got under the bar and walked it out. I squatted down, felt that awesome bottom position, and exploded out. I made it part way up and the bar stopped moving. I could hear the crowd cheering in encouragement. I dug down deep, tried pushing that floor away and driving my chest up, but I couldn’t do it. I started sinking back down, the spotting crew did their job and we re-racked the barbell. I found my wife in the crowd, where she was giving me a big smile and a thumbs up. She’s the fiercest competitor that I know. Was I down on myself because I missed the lift? Honestly, I wish I would have made it, but I was proud of myself for giving everything I had and stepping out and trying it. Did the lift fail because of a lack of preparation? Nope, one look at my training log proves that. Did it fail because of a lack of effort? Nope, I gave everything I had and I fought that bar as long as I could. Why did I fail at the lift? Simple…the bar was too heavy for where I’m at today. Now I know where my wall is. Now, it’s time to make a plan to break through that wall. Nothing is going to stop me. It can’t be done.

Several (long) hours later, it was time to deadlift. I opened with an easy 502. Next came 540. It was heavy, and it was a PR, but I made the lift with a 2-1 decision. My final attempt was coming up. I went over to the table and told the girl to go to 562 for my final attempt, a huge PR. I went back behind the platform to the waiting area and sat down in my chair. I had my hood up and my head down, feeling the music, visualizing the upcoming attempt. As I felt myself nodding my head to the beat, my jaw jutted out, and my upper lip began to curl as I got into the groove. Time slowed down and I felt ALIVE..!! Many things flashed through my mind. I could see all those mornings grinding out workouts at 4:30am in my garage. I could hear my defensive line coach telling me to “kick his ass” when I went in on a goal line stand. I could see the view that I had one time from the fire truck approaching a burning house with a report of kids trapped inside. It was a moment, like those others, that I was going to give everything I had. I might win, I might lose, but I was all in. My name was called. I tightened up my belt, chalked up, and walked out on the platform. I could feel that cold steel in my hands as I got in position. The head referee nodded and I sat back and pulled with everything I had. I stood up with that barbell, got the down command, and what did I see…3 red lights. According to the referee, I didn’t lock my knees out completely at the top of the lift. Did I fail? Yes, I missed the lift. Did I walk away with my head high? Hell yeah. I gave everything I had and now I know what I need to do to get better.

Now it’s your turn to go out and fail. Go out and fail because you pushed your boundaries to places you never imagined. Go out and fail because you tried something new and didn’t get it just right this time. Go out and fail because you weren’t afraid to go heavier than you’ve ever done before. Then try it again. Before long, you’ll do it and it will be time to set that next frontier. Get out of the way, because you won’t be stopped.

“Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.” – Robert F. Kennedy

====================================================
Check out one of our six E-Books:

• “Squat Every Day”
• “Eat What You Want”
• “Squat Every Day 2”
• “No Weaknesses”
• “Mash Program Sampler”
• “The Mash Blueprint for Program Design”

Check them out here: ⇒ Mash Elite E-Books

Coach Mash and the Eye of the Tiger

Check out one of our six E-Books:

• “Squat Every Day”
• “Eat What You Want”
• “Squat Every Day 2”
• “No Weaknesses”
• “Mash Program Sampler”
• “The Mash Blueprint for Program Design”

Check them out here: ⇒ Mash Elite E-Books

Eye of the Tiger

Yesterday, Emily Drew (my beautiful wife) took a trip to one of my original gyms, Jack Kings Gym. If you love the barbell and live anywhere near Winston-Salem, NC, you owe it to yourself to visit this amazing gym. As soon as we walked in the sweet aroma of sweat filled the air. Right away I knew that I was home.

This was the very gym that I Back Squatted by first raw 800lb. This was the very gym that I Deadlifted my first 800lb. This was the gym that I Benched my first raw 500lb. This is the gym that I started my professional powerlifting career. I was hungry for greatness in those days. I didn’t care about social media, videos, or anything else. I only cared about being the best powerlifter in the world.

I remembered the excitement that I felt in my stomach as I made the drive to Jack King’s Gym to meet Chris Ox Mason. I was excited for each and every training session in anticipation that I would either do something that I had never done or put in the work to do so soon. Every session was treated like it was the only training session on earth.

I won my first National Championships training at that gym, which put me well on my way to reaching my goals. Jack King’s Gym is raw. There is no fluff! There are barbells, bumpers, tons of metal weights, and some awesome old school machines for the almighty pump. Yes I like to get a pump too. I love being jacked! I mean, who doesn’t like being jacked?

Guys sometimes you have to take things back a bit to move forwards. I have some big goals this year. I want to get back on the platform in powerlifting and weightlifting. At 43-years-old you never know when your last competition might take place. That’s why Emily Drew and I are going to spend some time at Jack King’s Gym. I want to take it back. I want to remember why I started this journey. I want to feel that same excitement. I want to see what’s possible at 43-years-old.

I encourage all of you to simplify things every once in a while. It’s not about Instagram. It’s not about popularity. At least it’s not for me. It’s about looking at my own body as a piece of clay. Lifting weights gives me the ability to shape that clay in any way that I desire. I can make it bigger, smaller, more cut, stronger, or weaker. It’s up to me. This simplistic approach was a big part of keeping me same during the most unsettling times in my life. This small bit of control in a life that sometimes felt out of control kept me from going off a cliff.

Right now there are things that are somewhat unsettling in my life. Nothing like when I was young and crazy. I have God now, so it’s really hard to shake me. However, there are things outside of my control that are weighing on me. Yesterday’s session at Jack King’s Gym helped to relax me. I had fun slinging weights with my wife, and for just a moment not much else mattered. We were just two meatheads getting stronger and more jacked while loving every second.

My advice is that all of you use the gym for this. It shouldn’t become a place that stresses you out more. It should be a place that provides stability. You should embrace the process, and realize that each and every day is a step towards your goals. Nothing can stop that outside of God. The weights will be there waiting on you day in and day out just waiting to help you reach your goals. How beautiful is that?

Rocky III was all about Apollo Creed taking Rocky back to a real gym with hungry boxers. Rocky had let his fame and money make him soft. He had forgotten the reason that he started his boxing career. Apollo took him to his original gym filled with hungry boxers trying to make a name for themselves. It worked! Rocky found the eye of the tiger once again.

Yesterday was my version of taking it back. I am hungry once again to do great things on the platform. I still want to coach my athletes to be great, but I want one more year just to see what I can do.

Here’s what the workout looked like:

Snatch
80k x 2
85k x 2,
90k x 2
100k x 1
105k x 1
110k x 1 comeback PR

Clean & Strict Press Mash Method
85k x 1
70k x 5
90k x 1
70k x 5
95k/209lb x 1
70k/154lb x 7

I am excited that my snatches are feeling better each and every week especially with only performing them once per week. The muscular balance work has almost eliminated the twist that I have had for the last several years. I also added quite a bit more volume this week to get better at the movement.

The strict press was so much fun. I finally got back into the 200lb club with the 95k/209lb lift. It was pretty easy as well. It was probably an 8 RPE. I kept the higher rep sets the same in weight, and added a AMRAP set at the end. The post activation potentiation really helps to increase one’s ability to perform reps. I can definitely feel the added hypertrophy. After I compete sometime around June or July, I am going to start a massive cut for some endurance events at the end of the year.

You can check out more of my training logs at:

Coach Mash’s Training Log

Bringing the Juice or X’s and O’s?

I hope to see all of you at our “Even-Esh Underground Strength Coach and Mash Learn 2 Lift” Combined Certs. Here are the dates:

March 17th and 18th at the Mash Compound in Clemmons, NC find out more and get Early Bird Pricing Below:

Even-Esh and Mash Cert

June 9th and 10th will be at Zach’s place in Manaquan, New Jersy

Details coming later!

Bringing the Juice or X’s and O’s?

Saturday I was hanging out with Coach Joe Kenn, Head Strength and Conditioning Coach for the Carolina Panthers and two-time NSCA Coach of the Year. I am giving you a little of his background because I want you to know where this information is coming from. First let me give you a little more of the plot. Coach Kenn hosted a deadlift party at the Big House Power World Head Quarters. He invited an all-star cast of characters including:

• Martin Rooney, creator of Training for Warriors
• Chris Ox Mason, Pro-Powerlifter and owner of TFW Winston-Salem
• Coach Liane Blyn, Director of Strength and Conditioning at Appalachian State University and World Champion Powerlifter
• Coach Justin Blatnik, one of Coach Kenn’s assistants and a competitive strength athlete
• Derek Selles, champion powerlifter, professional videographer and editor
• Justin Lovingood, National Weightlifter and Powerlifter

The deadlift party was awesome, but it was the talk afterwards that intrigued me the most. It was awesome to hear Martin, Coach Kenn, and Coach Blyn talk about “brining the juice” on a daily basis. They were talking about bringing the energy, motivation, and buy-in to their athletes on a daily basis. They agreed that this ability trumped exercise science knowledge.

I have to agree. Now let me be the first to say that this life should be one big quest for knowledge. It just seems that lately the world is made up of so-called experts that have never really coached anyone, and all they want to talk about is energy systems and periodization. That entirely means nothing if you don’t have the ability to relay the information to your athletes in a way where they buy-in to what you are saying. That’s simply a fact!

Martin told us that there are now studies being done showing increases in performance from athletes coached by dynamic coaches versus low-key coaches. I will need to look at those studies first, but it only makes sense. As an athlete, I didn’t want to be coached by some boring dude talking about fiber types. I wanted to be coached by someone that understands fiber types and recruitment. However, when we are in the gym training, I want that coach to have the ability to shift my mindset and work harder than ever.

I have known opposite ends of the spectrum in my lifetime. I have known coaches that had all the knowledge that were never able to acquire one good athlete because they were so boring. I have also known mental clowns that thought yelling was a program. Neither extreme is worthy of advertisement. Neither extreme will ever create one good athlete.

A great strength coach spends his life acquiring knowledge. The athletes deserve that. They trust us with their careers and lives. It is up to us to do everything in our power to ensure that they are getting every tool necessary to reach their goals. Personally I don’t care if my athletes are constantly improving, getting stronger, and winning. That doesn’t mean that I have the perfect program. The quest for the perfect program never ends.

However, here’s the part that the Instagram Coach has no idea about. A great strength coach is a performer. The weight room is our stage, and each day is another episode of our show. Each day, my goal is to motivate, encourage, and entertain my athletes. Yes I want to entertain my athletes. Get over yourself already! It is ok to have fun in the weight room. Heck if you want to see you athletes improve, let them have fun and watch their numbers skyrocket.

Coach Kenn is a performer. I have watched him coach at the Carolina Panthers Stadium several times. The guys love him. His big smile and crazy lingo make it fun for these athletes to go to the gym. Guess what? Most football players don’t want to go to the gym. They want to play football. If you want them to see results in the weight room, find ways to get them to enjoy their time.

Martin Rooney is the King of Performers. I know because I have watched him give a presentation for Perform Better, and it was amazing. He owns the crowd from the minute he starts talking, and the crowd loves every second. When he is done with them, they leave that room wanting to be better athletes and coaches.

Here’s the thing that I want to leave you with. If you want to be a strength coach, you need to learn from real strength coaches. If someone that has coached less than five people in their lifetime is grooming you, you are a fool. People can talk theory all they want, but you want to find out the exact results that they have gotten with their athletes. The best program in the world is worthless if no athlete in the world will buy into it.

If you are a prospective strength coach, weightlifting coach, or powerlifting coach, I encourage you to spend 50% of your time on acquiring knowledge and the other 50% on communication skills. If you can relate to your athletes, you can impact their lives. If you can’t, you are worthless as a coach. Now that’s the bottom line, and I hope that all of you will go out and crush it this week with your athletes. They deserve your best.

===================================================================
Check out one of our five E-Books:

• “Squat Every Day”
• “Eat What You Want”
• “Squat Every Day 2”
• “No Weaknesses”
• “Mash Program Sampler”
• “The Mash Blueprint for Program Design”

Check them out here: ⇒ Mash Elite E-Books

Intangible Attributes of Great Strength Coaches

I hope to see all of you at our “Even-Esh Underground Strength Coach and Mash Learn 2 Lift” Combined Certs. Here are the dates:

March 17th and 18th at the Mash Compound in Clemmons, NC find out more and get Early Bird Pricing Below:

Even-Esh and Mash Cert

June 9th and 10th will be at Zach’s place in Manaquan, New Jersy

Details coming later!

Intangible Attributes of Great Strength Coaches

Yesterday I had the honor of visiting the weight room of Wake Forest Football Strength and Conditioning. They just come off of one of their best in a longtime going 8-6, and winning the Military Bowl against 25th ranked Temple Owls. Being in the weight room with the team made it easy to understand why this team did so well. Did I mention that they are a young team as well, so look out?

Coach Brandon Hourigan is their Head Strength Coach, and it was easy to see what makes him great. Coach Hourigan brought the energy to the program. He was lit on fire, and the team responded. Weightlifting Coaches could learn a thing or two from great strength and conditioning coaches if they would open their minds to learning new ideas.

Here’s what made the program great:

• The Programming was excellent
1. Excellent movement and injury prevention warm up
2. Neck Work to prevent concussions
3. Cleans performed exceptionally well for a football program (remember they are not weightlifters)
4. Full Depth Squats
5. Emphasis on the posterior Chain
6. Partner Stretching
• The Team Comraderie was through the roof! People were cheering each other on, supporting one another, and helping each other.
• The Athletes were having fun! This one is way too often overlooked. If you make the weight room a scary, boring, or bashing place, none of the athletes will want to be there.
• The Coaches were coaching the entire practice. Yes they were pumping the players up, but they were also coaching the movements and helping the athletes.
• Work ethic was off the charts, and it was the entire team.
• The Head Coach was leading from the front, and he was the energy of the room. Coach Hourigan brought the intensity to the room. Plus I have to say that his new beard is on Fleek!

Some of these points might seem elementary to some of you, but I promise that 50% of these elements are missing from 95% of all programs. I have visited multiple D1 Weight Rooms, and I have to give Coach Hourigan an A+. I think that my man Coach Kenn of the Carolina Panthers would like this guy and his staff, and that’s saying something because Coach Kenn has the highest standards.

I am excited to announce that Zach Even-Esh and I are teaming up to teach another dual certification. I believe that combined we go over all the attributes necessary to become a great strength and conditioning coach. Here’s what we are going to cover:

• 1) Athlete Warm Ups & Assessments / Large Group Training
• 2) Bodyweight & Jump Training for Athletes (Sport + Strength Athletes)
• 3) Quick Lifts & Assistance Work for Sport & Strength Athletes (Barbell / Dumbbells)
• 4) Program Design for Athletes from Youth to D1 to Olympic Hopefuls
• 5. Snatch basics and teaching progressions
• 6. Clean basics and teaching progressions
• 7. Squat Programming and Tricks
• 8. Deadlift Programming and Tricks
• 9. Controlling and demanding the respect of groups

Guys great strength coaches are way more than programmers or technique guys. Personally I believe that great weightlifting coaches are way more than programmers and technique guys. One of the reasons that I love Dane from Garage Strength is that he gets his lifters fired up. His lifters feed off of his intensity. Heck, I can see that at the meets. He’s just a bigger taller version of me, and that’s why his team is unreal.

If your athletes don’t want to be in the weight room, you are not coaching. If your athletes aren’t working hard, you are not coaching. If your athletes aren’t cheering each other on and supporting one another, you aren’t coaching. If your athletes aren’t smiling because they are having fun, you aren’t coaching. This is the bottom line.

This is what separates the online gurus that have never produced one solid athlete, and the coaches that are producing the ballers. You can read “Supertraining” and all the programming books that you like, but these intangible traits of great coaches will be the ones that make or break you. You can develop the coolest looking excel sheets on the planet, but if your athletes don’t buy in to your program, you don’t have anything. What I am saying now is the truth that all of you need to hear.

Now go look yourself in the mirror and ask yourself if you are producing this culture in your gym or not. If you are not, these are the things that you need to work on. I have watched coaches with average sport science and programming knowledge produce amazing athletes by getting their athletes to buy in and producing the proper culture in the gym. I have also watched people that I consider to be brilliant exercise scientists never produce one good athlete.

Guys you have to have it all to be a great coach. You have to be the energy on the weight room each and every day. You have to find ways to get your athletes to have fun and want to be in the room with you. I hope that everyone reading this will become great strength coaches, and that’s why I am dropping this tough love on all of you. Now walk in your weight room today filled with energy. Walk in your weight room today and find ways to help your athletes love what they are doing.

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I hope to see all of you at our “Even-Esh Underground Strength Coach and Mash Learn 2 Lift” Combined Certs. Here are the dates:

March 17th and 18th at the Mash Compound in Clemmons, NC find out more and get Early Bird Pricing Below:

Even-Esh and Mash Cert

June 9th and 10th will be at Zach’s place in Manaquan, New Jersy

Details coming later!

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